The Recovery and Social Inclusion theme is organised under seven sub-units and a central narrative about a young male service user called John. Whilst you can select and work through the unit in any order, it is recommended that you visit the research and definitions sub-unit first and then watch the video titled 'Activity - John'.

Click here to re-cap your understanding of the meaning and principles of recovery.

Click here to watch John’s narrative. A transcript of this narrative can be found here. As you work through the remaining sub-units you will be asked to reflect on John's story and consider how you might apply your learning on recovery and social inclusion to practice.

Look at John’s story in terms of sexuality, intimacy and relationships. You may be inclined to overlook relationships and sexuality as important aspects of your work with John.

ACTION: Follow this link to learn how a Recovery and Social Inclusion approach might inform your work with John in terms of sexuality, intimacy and relationships.

Look at John's story in terms of diagnosis, labelling and stigma. You may be inclined to think of John as a “Paranoid Schizophrenic”.

ACTION: Follow this link to learn how a Recovery and Social Inclusion approach might inform your work with John in terms of the impact of a diagnosis.

Look at John's story in terms of your role in helping John to maintain his own safety. You may be inclined to think of risk as a negative concept and that risks should be avoided, rather than seeing risk as an opportunity for personal growth.

ACTION: Follow this link to learn how a positive approach to risk might inform your work with John in terms of recovery and social inclusion.

Look at John's story in terms of his version of reality. You may be inclined to think that John’s version of reality constitutes a delusion.

ACTION: Follow this link to learn how a Recovery and Social Inclusion approach might inform your work with John in terms of challenging medicalised understandings and enabling you to work with people whose ideas may be different to our own.

Look at John's story in terms of your role in developing a hope-inspiring relationship and supporting John to find meaning in his experiences.

ACTION: Follow this link to learn more about hope and meaning-giving in terms of supporting John's recovery journey.

We have used a narrative (John’s story) as a starting point for studying mental health recovery.

ACTION: To find out more about people’s stories of Recovery as narrative, follow this link.

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.